What You Don’t See

Jun 19
Leader-Post:
Hey John. I’m thinking of doing something about the tough position Ryan Meili is in over TransMountain. I saw he’s taking a tonne of flak on social media over his post. Care to share your thoughts in a bit more depth?

Maybe.

A few minutes later, I responded:
Meili is in the unenviable position of having to create critically important change in a population saturated by Petrostate propaganda. It’s not easy to speak with people who can’t listen because their brains are baked into an idea that pipelines are our only route to prosperity. Of course that’s not true. Evraz workers could be building wind turbines, and solar array racking, and rails for trains to carry people on zero emission futuristic cross-Canada trips. How’s he going to fit that into a soundbite that will go into a story in the newspaper that’s working with an “Energy War” propaganda room in Alberta with the Petrostate government there?

Any other questions about this?

Leader-Post:
Do you think he’s likely to shed support from people whose number one issue is climate change?

Some individuals may choose to stay home or vote differently, but they’ll be hurting themselves if they care about the climate crisis as a central issue. What could be more important than the expected end of our livable world before the Maple Leafs have a predicted shot at winning the Stanley Cup again?
Meili may not be right about the pipeline, but I do think he’s serious about some real pollution reduction, and that’s more than can be said about Moe’s Sask Party.

(If the Leafs win in 26 years according to the previous Leafs and Jays then Raptors wins, that’s 2045)

har har.

Leader-Post:
Thanks for this. Might have a follow-up later.

(there wasn’t)
You’re welcome. Sure.

My comments didn’t appear in the newspaper online later that day.

Killer Premier Avoids Jail

Saskatchewan: where if you’re a white 3rd generation immigrant/settler, you get a ticket for killing someone with careless driving, but if you’re a first generation, brown immigrant, you’ll get 8 years in jail for killing people through the same crime.

This is called “white privilege”.

Additionally, after killing someone, when you’re white, you’re eligible to be elected by your political party to the highest political office in the province.
The sentence today for a careless driver who was not drunk, seems a bit harsh in comparison to our killer Premier.

Should people go to jail for killing someone (while driving)? Absolutely, even if it’s only for a week.

Now for controversial claims:
If the Humboldt Broncos who died had been on bicycles, the driver of the semi probably would have got a 2 year jail sentence.

If the hockey players had been school children on their way back from a field trip, the driver would have got a 6 year sentence.

SaskParty “just plain mean” to not reconsider STC cut

To wreck what is built, claiming others will provide something else in its place, while the passage of time reveals that others will provide even less, is poor planning at best. More to the point, it’s mean or heartless when the wreckers refuse to rebuild what they’ve torn down.

To: Minister Joe Hargrave

cc: Premier Scott Moe; Buckley Belanger (Critic for First Nations and Metis Relations and Highways); Danielle Chartier (Critic for Seniors, Health and Status of Women); David Forbes (Critic for Diversity, Equality and Human Rights); Doyle Vermette (Critic for Northern Saskatchewan)

I’m writing to express my mounting dismay about the cut to STC, following the recent news of Greyhound shutting down its operations in Western Canada.

In March 2017, after your government announced the decision to shut down STC, you said to the media: “We’re optimistic there will be other services provided by private entrepreneurs or a non-profit organization.” This belief that private companies would replace STC services was major part of your message to the public following the announcement of the STC closure.

The fact is, despite your unfounded early optimism, private companies and non-profits have not filled the role that STC did. Over one year since STC’s closure, private companies are only servicing 28 locations, as compared to STC’s former 253 points of service. And now, with Greyhound pulling all of its Western Canada routes, inter-city transportation is about to become even more limited (and therefore more risky) for the people of Saskatchewan.

The devastating impacts of the abrupt closure of STC have been well documented in the media. Assuming you and your colleagues have been paying attention to these stories and numbers, you will know that many people across the province are experiencing tremendous hardship as a result of this decision. Many people have been forced to assume huge risks to their safety and health by hitchhiking or accepting rides from unsafe people, missing or delaying medical appointments, and/or becoming more deeply isolated.

Shutting down STC was a cruel and short-sighted decision that has had a disproportionate impact on people who are already extremely marginalized: Indigenous women, people living with disabilities and chronic illnesses, people living in rural and remote communities including reserves, people living in poverty, and seniors. To pull people’s only source of inter-city transportation from them without firmly securing a suitable alternative is just plain mean.

Minister, if you and your government honestly thought that private companies would fill the void left behind by STC, now that you know that this is not the case (in fact the opposite is happening), you have a responsibility to repeal the decision and re-vamp STC. To know the consequences of this decision, and to stand by it, is inhumane and heartless.

I urge you to take this letter, and others like it, seriously.

Thanks for reading,
Shayna Stock

PCC Favours Autocratic Use of Bylaw

Dear Mx. Ross:

I was disappointed to hear that PCC doesn’t see value in having peaceful protesters in the Park on Canada Day, a day where we celebrate Canadian values protected by our Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Freedom of Assembly is one of those rights, and a bylaw or even a provincial law does not overrule the fundamental right First Nations people and their allies have to peacefully petition the government in front of the provincial government building.

Police time can be better spent on our national holiday with assisting people in the crowd as they did for me 4 years ago, saving my life. If they’d instead been hauling off people to jail for the non-illegal act of pushing the government to meet reasonable demands for improvements to our justice system, I would not be here to point this out to you. I consider the overnight camping bylaw to be intended to prevent people from camping for fun, or necessity due to lack of social housing, not as an autocratic excuse for police to defend the government from citizen protest movements.

You could have moved the event to where the teepee was set up in front of the Legislature last year, and saved the time of an inappropriate press release to pressure Regina Police into doing the wrong thing.

Thank-you for your consideration.
Sincerely,
John Klein