Just Transition summit – more video

I enjoyed these presentations, and you especially have to watch the concluding speech by Ella.

The adults spent most of the time driving/talking though, but it was worthwhile learning about more-fair ways to shut down the fossil fuel industry than waiting for the inevitable lay-offs after extended climate/water/soil/wildlife/people destruction.

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Just Transitions – Laura Stewart — Carbon Tax Song

At lunch, to entertain the crowd at the Just Transitions summit in Regina, musician and song writer Laura Stewart played her carbon tax song. It’s pretty catchy, and I hope the PM listens to it.

Just Transitions – More

Here are some useful tweets about Just Transition away from fossil fuels, and the Regina summit on the subject. I have videos and photos on an earlier blog post too.

 

Just Transitions Summit a Success

Check back later for more videos from the event.*****
*****

The organizers will have edited content from it online at a later time.
Here are my videos and photos from the two day event.

Just Transitions

The point was to find paths to implement a just transition for workers in fossil fuel industries in Saskatchewan, and what that means in our colonial and capitalist economy. Industries in the boom/bust cycle are infamous for shutting down within a day, and throwing the local economy into chaos, so just transitions is a solution to that problem, for a more fair transition to the renewable economy that can replace fossil fuels.






Just Transitions

Just Transitions

Greed and Envy

I don’t normally blog about work, because people can be pretty sensitive to coworkers talking about things to do with work, online. Salaries and earnings are especially sensitive, as many people stake personal worth, and social standing on the figures.

It’s worth pointing out though that the University of Regina has made an effort to be more transparent about how much it is paying its top-earning staff and faculty. The figures had been public before, but now they are online for more immediate perusal.

http://www.uregina. ca/orp/statistics/faculty-staff.html

The list shows almost everyone at the University making $100,000/year or more, each July.

I expect highly educated people in a specialized field to be making a lot of money, but frankly some of the salaries shocked me. Considering most of my coworkers took a pay cut last contract negotiation this year, it would have been possible to get significant pay raises with a small <0.5% cut to the top-earning staff and faculty instead. Cost of living isn’t being kept up with, by many staff in the CUPE 5791 union. While students suffer from increasing tuition as the province fails to fund the university enough, it’s not fair to be asking front-line staff to take pay cuts while more than 400 other people make 3 to 10 times more than a typical student wage. It is income inequality beyond the pale.

SaskParty “just plain mean” to not reconsider STC cut

To wreck what is built, claiming others will provide something else in its place, while the passage of time reveals that others will provide even less, is poor planning at best. More to the point, it’s mean or heartless when the wreckers refuse to rebuild what they’ve torn down.

To: Minister Joe Hargrave

cc: Premier Scott Moe; Buckley Belanger (Critic for First Nations and Metis Relations and Highways); Danielle Chartier (Critic for Seniors, Health and Status of Women); David Forbes (Critic for Diversity, Equality and Human Rights); Doyle Vermette (Critic for Northern Saskatchewan)

I’m writing to express my mounting dismay about the cut to STC, following the recent news of Greyhound shutting down its operations in Western Canada.

In March 2017, after your government announced the decision to shut down STC, you said to the media: “We’re optimistic there will be other services provided by private entrepreneurs or a non-profit organization.” This belief that private companies would replace STC services was major part of your message to the public following the announcement of the STC closure.

The fact is, despite your unfounded early optimism, private companies and non-profits have not filled the role that STC did. Over one year since STC’s closure, private companies are only servicing 28 locations, as compared to STC’s former 253 points of service. And now, with Greyhound pulling all of its Western Canada routes, inter-city transportation is about to become even more limited (and therefore more risky) for the people of Saskatchewan.

The devastating impacts of the abrupt closure of STC have been well documented in the media. Assuming you and your colleagues have been paying attention to these stories and numbers, you will know that many people across the province are experiencing tremendous hardship as a result of this decision. Many people have been forced to assume huge risks to their safety and health by hitchhiking or accepting rides from unsafe people, missing or delaying medical appointments, and/or becoming more deeply isolated.

Shutting down STC was a cruel and short-sighted decision that has had a disproportionate impact on people who are already extremely marginalized: Indigenous women, people living with disabilities and chronic illnesses, people living in rural and remote communities including reserves, people living in poverty, and seniors. To pull people’s only source of inter-city transportation from them without firmly securing a suitable alternative is just plain mean.

Minister, if you and your government honestly thought that private companies would fill the void left behind by STC, now that you know that this is not the case (in fact the opposite is happening), you have a responsibility to repeal the decision and re-vamp STC. To know the consequences of this decision, and to stand by it, is inhumane and heartless.

I urge you to take this letter, and others like it, seriously.

Thanks for reading,
Shayna Stock