Greed and Envy

I don’t normally blog about work, because people can be pretty sensitive to coworkers talking about things to do with work, online. Salaries and earnings are especially sensitive, as many people stake personal worth, and social standing on the figures.

It’s worth pointing out though that the University of Regina has made an effort to be more transparent about how much it is paying its top-earning staff and faculty. The figures had been public before, but now they are online for more immediate perusal.

http://www.uregina. ca/orp/statistics/faculty-staff.html

The list shows almost everyone at the University making $100,000/year or more, each July.

I expect highly educated people in a specialized field to be making a lot of money, but frankly some of the salaries shocked me. Considering most of my coworkers took a pay cut last contract negotiation this year, it would have been possible to get significant pay raises with a small <0.5% cut to the top-earning staff and faculty instead. Cost of living isn’t being kept up with, by many staff in the CUPE 5791 union. While students suffer from increasing tuition as the province fails to fund the university enough, it’s not fair to be asking front-line staff to take pay cuts while more than 400 other people make 3 to 10 times more than a typical student wage. It is income inequality beyond the pale.

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PCC Favours Autocratic Use of Bylaw

Dear Mx. Ross:

I was disappointed to hear that PCC doesn’t see value in having peaceful protesters in the Park on Canada Day, a day where we celebrate Canadian values protected by our Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Freedom of Assembly is one of those rights, and a bylaw or even a provincial law does not overrule the fundamental right First Nations people and their allies have to peacefully petition the government in front of the provincial government building.

Police time can be better spent on our national holiday with assisting people in the crowd as they did for me 4 years ago, saving my life. If they’d instead been hauling off people to jail for the non-illegal act of pushing the government to meet reasonable demands for improvements to our justice system, I would not be here to point this out to you. I consider the overnight camping bylaw to be intended to prevent people from camping for fun, or necessity due to lack of social housing, not as an autocratic excuse for police to defend the government from citizen protest movements.

You could have moved the event to where the teepee was set up in front of the Legislature last year, and saved the time of an inappropriate press release to pressure Regina Police into doing the wrong thing.

Thank-you for your consideration.
Sincerely,
John Klein

No Justice In Wascana Park

A camp, Justice For our Stolen Children, was set up 111 days ago in Wascana Park in Regina outside the Legislature to pressure the government to fix systemic problems in the justice system which have led to widely publicized cases of injustice regarding indigenous victims of violence. Today Regina Police arrested peaceful protesters who refused to leave the park, and the government refused to meet with the protesters aside from telling them to leave so the grass wouldn’t die.

“Telling them to leave so the grass won’t die. That’s horrible.”

It is, especially since on the other side of the park, they’re cutting down old-growth trees to make way for development for a bank.

Watch the video.

Regina Bitcoin Community meets at Tavern

About 40 people showed up to Vic’s Tavern on Tuesday to talk about cryptocurrencies. Among the hot topics:

“Is Bitcoin a bubble?”, and “What is Ethereum?”.

In my table before the group discussion, everyone said Bitcoin was a bubble, but with a big caveat, that it will burst into other newer cryptocurrencies, not mostly back into dollars. In the larger group, few were willing to say it was a bubble. I, and Mike S. were asked to speak for the group to the media that showed up with questions about cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin. One person, I think it was Kai, or was it Mike (safe bet, there were no fewer than 3 at my table), explained that there were many bubbles in cryptocurrencies, all percolating and popping frequently, faster than most notice.

I felt a little like a celebrity in the room, as several people recognized me from my Bitcoin Symposiums I helped put together 3 years ago when similar crowds came out for an evening of education and visiting.

3rd Regina Solar Co-op founding meeting

On Monday I was pleased to attend the 3rd meeting held in Regina with the objective of forming a solar power co-operative. By late November, there should be money in the bank, and a lot more research complete, which will assist interested Saskatchewanians with setting up solar power systems of their own.

Here’s a CBC radio interview with one of the organizers.

Check how much you could save, while paying off a warrantied solar array that will function long after you’ve made an important home improvement.

Regina Solar Co-op meeting at Artful Dodger on 11th Ave.

3rd? Yes, there’ve been 2 meetings this Winter, but I’m counting one meeting put together by Susan Birley last Winter as the first.