Ridden Out On A Rail

I’d like @YoungBe_young to reject spending over $109,000,000 on moving rail lines that people will soon need to use again for transportation in and out of Regina. How many properties are paying tax in #yqrcc? Let’s assume a high 50,000. That’s $2200 each, to wait less in traffic on some streets, at uncommon times you encounter a long train. Can you think of a better way to spend more than two thousand of your tax dollars?

Additionally it would be a gift to private industry, since CP and CN are not publicly owned any longer. We already gave hundreds of millions of dollars to the Roughriders so they’d have a shiny new stadium, and that raised the city’s debt noticeably. Property taxes have gone up for that as a result of  stadium spending.

For less than half the cost of  a gift to CP/CN, we could have more than 50 new, electric buses. Yes, quiet, efficient, non-polluting public transportation that everyone can depend more on. That’s how you wait less in traffic, the smart way. The stupid way is to give twice as much money to ripping out infrastructure that should be publicly owned still.

We should be able to take low-polluting trains to other points in Canada from our capital city. That opportunity was robbed from my generation, back in 1990. To ensure our kid’s generation has an opportunity to raise kids, we need to restore this mode of transportation to supremacy in the next decade. Wasting $109Mil moving Regina in the wrong direction is irresponsible, financially reckless, and contradicts the 100% Renewable by 2050 motion passed by Council last year.grain car

Riders and Raptors Tonight

Not enough bike rack space for the Stadium, but that’s a problem almost any event in the Summer if the bike valet isn’t operating.

Between 5 and 6:45 p.m., residents can take a transit shuttle to Mosaic Stadium from the following pickup locations:
• Downtown
• Southland Mall
• Warehouse
• University of Regina

*Northgate Mall was not available to participate due to conflicting events.

I’ve asked the City to update us on what will be done about a bike lane to the stadium that was promised to us before they even started construction.

Little Transit Progress Steps

Councillor Stevens sent this message to the RCPTC transit activism group:

“This Thursday, the Community and Protective Services Committee will consider a proposal to introduce an airport route. A report on improving Sunday and holiday service was positively received by the Committee a few months ago, and has advanced to the budget deliberation stage. The Accessibility Advisory Committee is reconvening, the costs of monthly passes have gone down, and a low-income pass was introduced.

Keep up the great work!

Andrew”

These are certainly welcome items. If you can help convince the Committee on Thursday we have people harmed by having no Airport route, please do so.

We need bigger improvements in the medium and long terms, so let’s keep pushing for them.

Transit Report To Improve Regina

Six years ago I ran a transit petition in the city, with a specific list of changes needed to immediately improve bus services in Regina. I also helped re-initiate the U-Pass discussion at the University of Regina, which led to implementation of the U-Pass a few years later. Unfortunately there haven’t been many significant improvements since, even though we face a climate crisis, and transit is a key to fighting it here in Regina.

City Council pledged to make Regina renewable by 2050, but they’ve not put our money where their mouths were.

Here’s the straight-forward list, shamefully not complete half a decade later:
X More frequent stop times after 9PM for routes serving major streets.
X Sundays and Holidays use the Saturday routes and schedule.
IN PROGRESS: Express routes on major roads including but not limited to Albert St., Broad St., Victoria Ave. & E.,
NOT DONE: Dewdney Ave., and Rochdale Blvd. Where possible, bus-only lanes will be created, and strictly enforced to reduce Transit delays.
Unclear if this is fixed: Enough Para-Transit resources made available to reduce by half or more, the 2011 monthly average number of stranded users requesting service, by the end of 2013.
X Bus or Shuttle service to the Regina #YQR Airport.

ADDED:

“Oh, can you pass on to them that the Number 8 route is The Best Route in the city. And it’s starting to get busier. People are discovering this transit secret.”

Carla Harris:
‏”Also test #YqrTransit on foot. Many residential bus stops & even stops on main roads are without sidewalks, which makes them inaccessible all winter & wet spring. You won’t notice these accessibility limitations until planners try walk to destinations from drop points themselves.”

Killer Premier Avoids Jail

Saskatchewan: where if you’re a white 3rd generation immigrant/settler, you get a ticket for killing someone with careless driving, but if you’re a first generation, brown immigrant, you’ll get 8 years in jail for killing people through the same crime.

This is called “white privilege”.

Additionally, after killing someone, when you’re white, you’re eligible to be elected by your political party to the highest political office in the province.
The sentence today for a careless driver who was not drunk, seems a bit harsh in comparison to our killer Premier.

Should people go to jail for killing someone (while driving)? Absolutely, even if it’s only for a week.

Now for controversial claims:
If the Humboldt Broncos who died had been on bicycles, the driver of the semi probably would have got a 2 year jail sentence.

If the hockey players had been school children on their way back from a field trip, the driver would have got a 6 year sentence.

SaskParty “just plain mean” to not reconsider STC cut

To wreck what is built, claiming others will provide something else in its place, while the passage of time reveals that others will provide even less, is poor planning at best. More to the point, it’s mean or heartless when the wreckers refuse to rebuild what they’ve torn down.

To: Minister Joe Hargrave

cc: Premier Scott Moe; Buckley Belanger (Critic for First Nations and Metis Relations and Highways); Danielle Chartier (Critic for Seniors, Health and Status of Women); David Forbes (Critic for Diversity, Equality and Human Rights); Doyle Vermette (Critic for Northern Saskatchewan)

I’m writing to express my mounting dismay about the cut to STC, following the recent news of Greyhound shutting down its operations in Western Canada.

In March 2017, after your government announced the decision to shut down STC, you said to the media: “We’re optimistic there will be other services provided by private entrepreneurs or a non-profit organization.” This belief that private companies would replace STC services was major part of your message to the public following the announcement of the STC closure.

The fact is, despite your unfounded early optimism, private companies and non-profits have not filled the role that STC did. Over one year since STC’s closure, private companies are only servicing 28 locations, as compared to STC’s former 253 points of service. And now, with Greyhound pulling all of its Western Canada routes, inter-city transportation is about to become even more limited (and therefore more risky) for the people of Saskatchewan.

The devastating impacts of the abrupt closure of STC have been well documented in the media. Assuming you and your colleagues have been paying attention to these stories and numbers, you will know that many people across the province are experiencing tremendous hardship as a result of this decision. Many people have been forced to assume huge risks to their safety and health by hitchhiking or accepting rides from unsafe people, missing or delaying medical appointments, and/or becoming more deeply isolated.

Shutting down STC was a cruel and short-sighted decision that has had a disproportionate impact on people who are already extremely marginalized: Indigenous women, people living with disabilities and chronic illnesses, people living in rural and remote communities including reserves, people living in poverty, and seniors. To pull people’s only source of inter-city transportation from them without firmly securing a suitable alternative is just plain mean.

Minister, if you and your government honestly thought that private companies would fill the void left behind by STC, now that you know that this is not the case (in fact the opposite is happening), you have a responsibility to repeal the decision and re-vamp STC. To know the consequences of this decision, and to stand by it, is inhumane and heartless.

I urge you to take this letter, and others like it, seriously.

Thanks for reading,
Shayna Stock