On TV, Talking Walking and Biking

Last September I had the good fortune to meet John Z Wetmore of Perils for Pedestrians, seen in over 150 cities on TV.
Cycling, and pedestrian advocates will mostly find it interesting, and there are great scenery shots of our city throughout the ending of the program.

I appear 22 minutes into this broadcast.

In 5-10 years, I think we could easily build a bike network of the sort Calgary has. Pedestrians should have curb cuts at every intersection, and all construction intersections should have accessibility accommodations.

Advertisements

Queen City Ex 2018

Queen City Ex
I made it to several evenings of the Queen City Ex this year, including the Arkells, Burton Cummings, and Craig Morgan musical acts. All 3 were excellent, although Burton started early, and ended early due to lightning in the area. I also saw the drum corps, and the Joshua Seth hypnosis show, as well as a light show at the end of the fair. I ran into many friends, and people I knew, even the police officer who helped save my life 4 years ago.

One of the highlights was a chance to try professionally prepared cricket cheese sandwiches. Here’s the customer in line behind me, who said she’s had moose, elk, rabbit, and so cricket is no stretch of the imagination.
Queen City Ex

Mach 3 looked like fun.
Queen City Ex

Some left the ride that dropped straight down, looking a little shaken. I watched a young boy, maybe 13 get off after first huddling in the chair for a few moments, and wipe his eyes dry before finally grinning to his family again.

Queen City Ex

Queen City Ex

Queen City Ex

New Moose Javian, Burton Cummings:
Queen City Ex

Queen City Ex 2018

Queen City Ex 2018

Queen City Ex 2018

Greed and Envy

I don’t normally blog about work, because people can be pretty sensitive to coworkers talking about things to do with work, online. Salaries and earnings are especially sensitive, as many people stake personal worth, and social standing on the figures.

It’s worth pointing out though that the University of Regina has made an effort to be more transparent about how much it is paying its top-earning staff and faculty. The figures had been public before, but now they are online for more immediate perusal.

http://www.uregina. ca/orp/statistics/faculty-staff.html

The list shows almost everyone at the University making $100,000/year or more, each July.

I expect highly educated people in a specialized field to be making a lot of money, but frankly some of the salaries shocked me. Considering most of my coworkers took a pay cut last contract negotiation this year, it would have been possible to get significant pay raises with a small <0.5% cut to the top-earning staff and faculty instead. Cost of living isn’t being kept up with, by many staff in the CUPE 5791 union. While students suffer from increasing tuition as the province fails to fund the university enough, it’s not fair to be asking front-line staff to take pay cuts while more than 400 other people make 3 to 10 times more than a typical student wage. It is income inequality beyond the pale.

Should You Buy Bitcoin?

BTC_Logo
First, a little history on this question. Assuming you plan to live past 2019, you may find the following demonstration useful.

Should you buy Bitcoin in:

2010 – YES
2011 – YES
2012 – YES
2013 – YES
2014 – YES
2015 – YES
2016 – YES
2017 – YES, although it’s scary right now if you bought in December.
2018 – YES? Yes.
2019 – YES? Yes.

The price of Bitcoin today is roughly $6700US or C$8888.88

UPDATE: As of 10:00pm tonight, the price of Bitcoin is roughly $9999.99
Although it will not continue to increase at this rate, and there will be chances to purchase it still for far less than today’s price, the point remains, if you want to turn some money into more money long term, buy and hold Bitcoin long term.

SaskParty “just plain mean” to not reconsider STC cut

To wreck what is built, claiming others will provide something else in its place, while the passage of time reveals that others will provide even less, is poor planning at best. More to the point, it’s mean or heartless when the wreckers refuse to rebuild what they’ve torn down.

To: Minister Joe Hargrave

cc: Premier Scott Moe; Buckley Belanger (Critic for First Nations and Metis Relations and Highways); Danielle Chartier (Critic for Seniors, Health and Status of Women); David Forbes (Critic for Diversity, Equality and Human Rights); Doyle Vermette (Critic for Northern Saskatchewan)

I’m writing to express my mounting dismay about the cut to STC, following the recent news of Greyhound shutting down its operations in Western Canada.

In March 2017, after your government announced the decision to shut down STC, you said to the media: “We’re optimistic there will be other services provided by private entrepreneurs or a non-profit organization.” This belief that private companies would replace STC services was major part of your message to the public following the announcement of the STC closure.

The fact is, despite your unfounded early optimism, private companies and non-profits have not filled the role that STC did. Over one year since STC’s closure, private companies are only servicing 28 locations, as compared to STC’s former 253 points of service. And now, with Greyhound pulling all of its Western Canada routes, inter-city transportation is about to become even more limited (and therefore more risky) for the people of Saskatchewan.

The devastating impacts of the abrupt closure of STC have been well documented in the media. Assuming you and your colleagues have been paying attention to these stories and numbers, you will know that many people across the province are experiencing tremendous hardship as a result of this decision. Many people have been forced to assume huge risks to their safety and health by hitchhiking or accepting rides from unsafe people, missing or delaying medical appointments, and/or becoming more deeply isolated.

Shutting down STC was a cruel and short-sighted decision that has had a disproportionate impact on people who are already extremely marginalized: Indigenous women, people living with disabilities and chronic illnesses, people living in rural and remote communities including reserves, people living in poverty, and seniors. To pull people’s only source of inter-city transportation from them without firmly securing a suitable alternative is just plain mean.

Minister, if you and your government honestly thought that private companies would fill the void left behind by STC, now that you know that this is not the case (in fact the opposite is happening), you have a responsibility to repeal the decision and re-vamp STC. To know the consequences of this decision, and to stand by it, is inhumane and heartless.

I urge you to take this letter, and others like it, seriously.

Thanks for reading,
Shayna Stock

PCC Favours Autocratic Use of Bylaw

Dear Mx. Ross:

I was disappointed to hear that PCC doesn’t see value in having peaceful protesters in the Park on Canada Day, a day where we celebrate Canadian values protected by our Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Freedom of Assembly is one of those rights, and a bylaw or even a provincial law does not overrule the fundamental right First Nations people and their allies have to peacefully petition the government in front of the provincial government building.

Police time can be better spent on our national holiday with assisting people in the crowd as they did for me 4 years ago, saving my life. If they’d instead been hauling off people to jail for the non-illegal act of pushing the government to meet reasonable demands for improvements to our justice system, I would not be here to point this out to you. I consider the overnight camping bylaw to be intended to prevent people from camping for fun, or necessity due to lack of social housing, not as an autocratic excuse for police to defend the government from citizen protest movements.

You could have moved the event to where the teepee was set up in front of the Legislature last year, and saved the time of an inappropriate press release to pressure Regina Police into doing the wrong thing.

Thank-you for your consideration.
Sincerely,
John Klein